Tag Archives: Cesarean delivery

The First Baby Study: A Prospective, Longitudinal Investigation of the Relationship between Mode of First Delivery and Subsequent Fertility

First Baby Study Data

Data from retrospective study conducted 2000-2008 with reported deficits in childbearing subsequent to Cesarean delivery, prior to the First Baby Study. Cumulative percentage of women who had at least one further live birth over eight to nine years follow-up after first birth.1

While retrospective studies conducted in countries throughout the world have reported deficits in childbearing subsequent to Cesarean delivery (including a study conducted from 2000 to 2008,* see figure), the First Baby Study (FBS), conducted by researchers at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, is the first prospective interview study designed specifically to investigate the effect of Cesarean delivery on subsequent childbearing and understand why the post-Cesarean fertility deficit occurs. More than 3,000 women were interviewed during their third trimester, and again at one, six, twelve, eighteen, twenty-four, thirty and thirty-six months postpartum. These women delivered between 2009 and 2011 at seventy-six hospitals in Pennsylvania, and approximately one-third had a Cesarean delivery. The primary goal of the interviews was to measure factors related to subsequent childbearing – including marital and relationship issues, use of birth control, subsequent pregnancy intentions, unprotected intercourse over the three years of follow-up, and difficulty conceiving or carrying subsequent pregnancies. Continue reading

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A Resident-Based Multi-Center Research Study of Women in Active Labor

A group of investigators at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, including OB/GYN resident physicians as site investigators, have recently completed a multi-center clinical trial and published the results in the Journal of Maternal Fetal and Neonatal Medicine (March 2015). The objective of the study was to determine if the intrapartum use of a 5 percent glucose-containing intravenous solution decreases the chance of a Cesarean delivery for women presenting in active labor, under the theory that the glucose would provide adequate energy for the contracting uterus and prevent Cesarean delivery. Another objective was to bring together other Pennsylvania medical centers with obstetric residency training programs (Lehigh Valley Hospital, Reading Hospital, and St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem) in this prospective and randomized study that analyzed 309 women. There was no significant difference in the Cesarean delivery rate for the glucose group (23/153 or 15 percent) versus the non-glucose group (18/156 or 11.5 percent). The authors concluded that the use of intravenous fluid containing 5 percent glucose does not lower the chance of Cesarean delivery for women admitted in active labor.

Jaimie Maines, M.D., former resident physician and soon-to-be faculty member in Penn State Hershey Women’s Health at the Medical Center, performed a key role in launching the study and co-authored the paper with Mary Anne Carrillo, M.D., a fourth-year resident in the department.

Jaimie Maines, M.D.

Jaimie Maines, M.D.

Mary Anne Carillo, M.D.

Mary Anne Carillo, M.D.

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